They Keep Killing Suzie

Roots: There are quotations from the Emily Dickenson poems "The Chariot", "Success is Counted Sweetest", and "My Life Closed Twice Before Its Close". We hear the songs Soley Soley and Gorecki by Lamb

Goofs: In Everything Changes PC Gwen Cooper had to do some serious digging to find out anything about Torchwood and Jack Harkness. Three months later, and the team (and Jack Harkness's flirting) are a regular source of complaining amongst DI Swanson's team.

When did she Suzie hatch the plan to come back in the first place? She's been conditioning Max for two years, yet the glove was clearly a new toy in Everything Changes. Also, she'd only ever brought somebody back for three minutes when she died, so how did she know permanent resurrection was even possible? And, in any case, the entire plan is far more convoluted than simply not shooting yourself in the head in the first place.

How did Max know to trigger the lockdown? Suzie had no idea she was going to get out of the Hub until she saw Gwen's note. Even in the unlikely event that Gwen smuggled her out via the cells, rather than some other route, she'd presumably have to have slipped him some form of trigger without Gwen noticing. And said trigger would had to have had the right time delay.

What makes Suzie think that Gwen is better than her?

Why does Jack call the police, rather than – say - Gwen, or the other branch of Torchwood?

The ISBN number 0198600585 is for The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (1996 edition), not a collection of Emily Dickinson's poetry. Also, the police appear to have bought a new copy of the book, but the scene is supposed to be happening at night.

Suzie claims she was so desperate to come back because of what was there in the afterlife. However, her plan to come back must have been hatched before she died and found that out.

How does Owen get that estimate of how long Gwen has?

Jack's revolver shouldn't be dropping spent cartridges on the floor.

Dialogue Triumphs: Swanson: "Are you always this dressy for a murder investigation?"

Memorable Moments: The police murder team's reaction to Torchwood being locked in their own base.

Continuity: Detective Swanson's team bitch about Torchwood all the time.

Retcon is compound B67. They've given the amnesia pill to 2008 people.

The Resurrection Gauntlet fell through the rift 40 years ago and lay at the bottom of the bay till Torchwood dredged it up. It only responded to Suzie and works much better when people have been killed by the knife that Suzie used. When Suzie's corpse is stabbed by the knife the glove brings her back properly. Jack specuates that the cause was the user (Gwen) wanting Suzie alive again. It connects the user and the deceased by some form of energy, and the longer the connection stays open, the more energy it drains – eventually healing the dead person's fatla wounds and giving the user the wounds the deceased died from. It appears to grant the deceased a similar form of immortality to the one Jack has. [Though it seems likely that Suzie would have been mortal again if Gwen had actually died.]

Pilgrim is a religious support group / debating society which left no online footprint. Suzie attended, and brainwashed one of the attendees to perform certain actions should she not turn up for three months. She says that she gave him an amnesia pill once a week every week for two years, claiming this was so that she had somebody to confide in about Torchwood.

When Torchwood employees die, Torchwood stashes all their stuff in a locker. Their bodies are kept and frozen.

Gwen claims to be religious "sort of, in passing".

Suzie says she slept with Owen. She hates her father and decides to kill him here.

Suzie describes death as "nothing" and "darkness", and says that there's something out there in the dark which is moving. [So Suzie's experience of death is not the afterlife seen in The Ghosts of N-Space.]

Links: This is a direct sequel to Everything Changes.

Extras: This episode of Torchwood has an episode of Torchwood Declassified.

Location: Cardiff, three months after Everything Changes.

The Bottom Line: "She's so much better." Now this is more like it. A decent plot, strong characterisation, real depth in the characters, and an exploration of genuinely adult issues (mortality, and whether life has a point in an atheistic universe). And to add to the enjoyment, Owen doesn't once behave like an unredeemable jerk.

Discontinuity Guide by Stephen Gray

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